Archives for posts with tag: lorries

Exol Lubricants, based in the West Midlands and Yorkshire, won an Award of Excellence from the Commercial Boat Operators Association (CBOA) for its commitment to the waterways. It was presented to Exol sales director and IAAF CV Committee chairman Steve Dunn at the Freight Transport Association Multimodal awards in front of more than 600 guests.

Exol has become a recognised user of the waterways, investing in this environmentally-friendly alternative to transport large loads. There is a practical advantage to using one barge rather than 25 lorries: as they have to test the arriving oil before it is unloaded, one barge load is easier to test than 25 lorry loads.  

Waterways transport is part of the company’s larger strategy to reduce its carbon footprint: something it is keen to promote to students on Aston University’s career and placements programme in which Exol is a partner.

The CBOA said it recognises Exol’s vision, commitment and good business sense in introducing a new barge, Exol Pride, to the North East waterways to transport raw materials from the port of Hull to its bulk-blending plant at Rotherham, Yorkshire. David Lowe, CBOA chairman, said: “The Award of Excellence – CBOA’s highest honour – acknowledges Exol’s significant contribution towards developing inland waterway transport in the UK and promoting this means of shipping within its industry. Many congratulations to the company.”

Left to right: David Gower (host, former English cricket captain), Steve Dunn Exol Sales Director, Dr David Quarmby CBE (CBOA  ), and Mark Field, Marketing Manager

Steve Dunn, Exol Lubricants sales director, said: “This continued investment in the waterways is part of our larger strategy of reducing our carbon footprint and exploring ways to protect the environment. We’re delighted to receive such prestigious recognition from CBOA and will continue to develop our contribution to barge transport.”

Exol is the largest independent lubricants company in the UK, manufacturing and supplying a range of lubricants and associated products to the automotive, commercial vehicle, agricultural, industrial, off highway and railway sectors from its bulk-blending plant in Rotherham.

 

 

 

 

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We know our roadways are getting more and more congested, and more people are seeking alternative forms of transport”, Steven Cadwell.

waxi

The Manchester Evening News reports that on November 7th a water taxi service was launched, connecting Manchester city centre with Sale and Old Trafford along the Bridgewater Canal.

Two Waxi boats – sadly built in Shanghai not Manchester – take passengers from Dukes 92 in Castlefield to the Trafford Centre, morning and evening, Mondays to Fridays –the first water taxi service in operation in Greater Manchester. More boats will be acquired as the business develops.

waxi-and-owner

Ride on the taxi via this video

Waxi was founded by entrepreneur Steven Cadwell (above) who originally wanted a service that ran from the city centre to MediaCityUK, but had to look at other options due to the construction of the Ordsall Chord which is due to be completed in 2017. Cadwell said:

“It’s something that will appeal to a lot of people who want a different way to travel to work or to football matches. We know our roadways are getting more and more congested, and more people are seeking alternative forms of transport”.

birmingham-canal-scene

Freight potential on the larger urban canals – any plans for Birmingham?

Walter Menzies, chair of the Manchester and Pennine Waterway Partnership of the Canal and River Trust which is responsible for 2,000 miles of canals in England and Wales – in Greater Manchester: the Peak Forest, the Macclesfield, the Huddersfield Narrow, the Ashton and the Rochdale writes: “There is talk of big improvements to the freight waterways in the north east – even of a Transpennine canal so that freight can travel from the Humber to the Mersey and then on to the wider world.

“Manchester Ship Canal has the potential to transport increasing numbers of  containers by water, which will reduce road traffic congestion and carbon dioxide emissions from lorries”.