Archives for category: Solihull

Time-pressed residents of Birmingham, Solihull, Cannock, Dudley, Coventry, Lichfield, Sandwell, South Staffs, Tamworth, Walsall and Wolverhampton who regularly scan their section of the Brummie site, appreciate the free service it gives, whatever their interests. Main news items covered, include a range of locally run websites, music and the arts, sport and business.

Links to them give those sites a wider readership than would otherwise have been possible. Until the final few months Mark was a helpful and courteous correspondent and this later lack of response was ascribed to pressure of other work, which involved travelling abroad. We now can see that there may have been health concerns claiming priority.

Three of many interests served: Our Birmingham, West Midlands Producers and Localise West Midlands thank him and hope that a way will be found to maintain the Brummie.

 

 

 

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A volunteer with the project has drawn our attention to the visit of a group of teenagers from Chernobyl who will be welcomed to Solihull this summer for a four week recuperative holiday, organised by Chernobyl Children’s Project Solihull Group (CCP). This year’s hosting marks the 31st anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster.

Youngsters aged between 13 and 15 from the CCP are in remission after treatment for brain tumours, leukemia, Hodgkins lymphoma, Wilm’s tumour, melanoma & neuroblastoma. They will travel from Belarus accompanied by a doctor and interpreters. While in the borough, fresh air and uncontaminated food will boost their damaged immune systems helping them to recover.

Each year a different group of children and accompanying adults are met at Manchester airport to stay for two weeks with host families and a further two weeks staying together in residential accommodation where local people volunteer to provide meals. Many trips and enjoyable activities have been planned for them. The children come from different areas and met for the first time recently at the Belarussian Embassy in Minsk, where they were granted visas to travel to the UK on the 29th July. They’ll be accompanied by interpreters Ira and Student Alina who will be returning to Solihull for a third time and this year they will be joined by first timer Doctor Tanya.

Last year they visited Barry Island

And Warwick Castle

 

This year CCP Solihull have received donations from many individuals, groups and companies; enabling us to bring the children to the UK. They have also held some successful fundraising events, including the recent Ladies Lunch which raised £2708. These gifts will not only bring the group to Solihull, but also improve the lives of disabled children and support cancer and hospice care in Belarus.

Anyone wishing to help with this year’s holiday, or wishing to make a donation, please contact Kath Ruane at kenkath.ruane@gmail.com 

Kath Ruane

Solihull Group Co-ordinator CCP (UK)

 

 

 

 

 

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Learn more about renowned botanist world traveller Ernest Wilson, trained at Edgbaston Botanical Gardens, next Monday evening, at 7.30.pm at Earlswood Village Hall, Valley Rd, Earlswood, Solihull B94 6BZ

Ann Turner will give a lively account of her extensive research into the life of plant collector Ernest Wilson, who lived in Shirley and was educated at Birmingham Municipal Technical School (now Aston University).

Her search began when she wondered Dove Tree Court retirement apartments in Shirley got its name.  Ernest Wilson who was sent to China to track down the rare Dove Tree, sometimes known as the Handkerchief Tree (below).

It took two years for Wilson to find one, and that was hanging over a cliff edge. When he was returning to England, with his specimens his boat was wrecked, but he managed to save this precious plant.

Finding that no-one she knew locally had heard of this remarkable man, she and her husband Malcolm embarked on a ‘wonderful journey’, completed only a couple of weeks ago after travelling to London and finding the house where Ernest Wilson lived with his family, while he was working at Kew Gardens.

A wide range of contacts made included contacts with the Arnold Arboretum in Boston USA (where all his records are kept), and Mount Royal cemetery, Montreal Canada (where he and his wife are buried).

 

 

 

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The Powergen building, in Shirley Solihull, was vacated in 1995, when the council refused planning permission for the CEGB to extend this striking Madin building. It employed 1000 people and many shops closed due to this loss of trade.

Explore the remarkable interior of this building, immortalised unofficially by a group of young explorers who made a fascinating video, recorded on site. Here are three of the most striking photographs taken from that film: 

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And last Thursday accomplished amateur photographers, Shirley’s Ann & Malcolm Turner, sent this photograph of the demolition process.

After years of neglect, demolition started, due to a decision taken by Solihull council, commercial partners of Asda.

 

 

 

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On 12th May, the Chairman of the Dickens Heath Residents Association reports that the Planning Inspectorate has refused the landowner’s appeal against for permission to build a detached house in Rumbush Lane Coppice (B90).

Their decision follows the refusal, on 18th April, of an application to fell 31 trees in Rumbush Lane Coppice several protected by Tree Preservation Orders to make way for this building. The inspectorate noted that the local area has been subject to an extensive amount of built development including a large new residential area, some of which is still under construction, immediately to the west of the site. The site and the wooded area immediately to the north east therefore provides a pleasant verdant feature within an increasingly built-up area and a notable area of mature woodland in local views including along Rumbush Lane and the other nearby residential streets.

The local community campaigned hard for this outcome, backed by local residents’ groups, the Solihull Tree Wardens, Solihull MBC Tree Officer and Dickens Heath Parish Council. 

The Residents’ Association welcomes these decisions, which they expect will finally close down options for future development and fully reinforce the protected status of this important local coppice.

 

 

 

 

Employees at Blythe Valley Park in Solihull can now use a free shuttle bus from Solihull and Birmingham International to and around this business park. The colourful, eye-catching shuttle bus service is operated by Solihull-based transport service provider LandFlight, formerly known as Silverline. It runs 16 daily shuttles, each accommodating up to 60 people, between the park and the two rail stations.

Deborah Fennell, park manager at Blythe Valley Park, said: “This bus service not only helps us reduce our collective carbon footprint but also ensures that parking demands continue to be met without impacting on the space and facilities we can offer businesses. By providing complimentary and convenient connections between the park and nearby rail stations, we encourage visitors and employees at the park to use public transport for their commute.”

The owners of the park, IM Properties, introduced this service to encourage park employees to commute via public transport. Approximately 2,700 people working for the park’s 24 companies and more will come on as site continues to develop.

Water taxi used in Leeds, advocated for use between Icknield Port and the congested, polluted Birmingham city centre:

Canal or riverside business and industrial parks are able to take another measure to reduce air pollution and ease traffic congestion by extending the use of water buses for passengers, already operating in a number of cities (above), and larger vessels for bulky freight (below).

In Trafford Park which has transport links by road, rail, water and air, businessman Graham Dixon advocates using Manchester’s waterways rather than clogging up the road network with cargo. He has welcomed the first arrival – a 2300 tonne ship, RMS Duisburg, which brought two large silos from Germany, bound for a Manchester factory.

Dixon’s ultimate vision is for Esprit’s Trafford Docks which he has re-opened and refitted, to be busy once again, bringing bulk goods such as road salt, aggregates, grain and biomass via the Manchester Ship Canal into Manchester. This would remove many lorries from the surrounding roads, reducing congestion and pollution.

As he said: “If one ship brings 3000 tonnes of freight up the canal, that’s over 100 lorry journeys removed from the roads, requiring only the first and the final few miles to be carried by lorry instead of potentially hundreds of miles.”

Richard Wise writes: “This portrait of my daughter Samantha daydreaming on our doorstep in 1969 fuelled my interest in photography”.   

He is able to put his interest to work even today through his volunteer work for Headway Birmingham & Solihull.

Entry to the exhibition is free, but any money raised from the sale of catalogues will be donated to Headway.

Headway Birmingham and Solihull (B&S) is a local charity set up to give help and support to people affected by brain injury. We do this by offering services to meet the needs identified by those affected by brain injury.

Read more about Headway here: http://www.headway-bs.co.uk/history

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This series – to which reader are invited to contribute – opened with a tirade about the failings of our bus servicesPositive news would be preferred however and the editor thanks Ann and Malcolm Turner (below) who recently recommended the A2B taxi service (0121 733 3000).

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 Why choose A2B?

  • Not because A2B is Birmingham & Solihull’s largest taxi company, with over 650 private hire vehicles operating.
  • Not because the A2B business has been around since 1991 and moves around 4.5 million passengers each year, servicing in excess of 500 business in the region.
  • And not because A2B can provide a vehicle to suit any journey & occasion, 24 hours a day, 365 days of the year.

Because, having tried it several times since the recommendation, the writer found them totally efficient, arriving a few minutes before schedule and offering really good customer service, unlike other taxi services in the locality which have proved extremely unreliable.

 

 

 

 

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Residents’ Rally 11.00am, Sunday 22nd January

Assemble In Top Field Entrance from Woodloes Road

Solihull Ratepayers are pressing for a reduction in the numbers of proposed new housing in the area and protection for public amenity land around the Woodlands and Badgers Estates

A rally to protect the council owned site is planned for 11.00am next Sunday 22nd January on the threatened section near the Woodloes Road Access to the fields (see photo below)

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The public amenity land around the Woodlands and Badgers estates

SRA’s Membership Secretary writes:

“Having lived and brought up my family on the Woodlands Estate I understand the importance of this longstanding public amenity area and the wooded corridor to the Bills Lane Bridleway to the health and well being of the local community and we mustn’t let it be swallowed up by development.

This section of land is owned by Solihull Council who represent us the community and they cannot blame greedy developers this time.

If you possibly can take time out on Sunday morning please attend for a photo shoot to demonstrate the level of public support to retain this reasonable section of green buffer around the South Shirley estates.

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Keep up with further developments on https://en-gb.facebook.com/solihullratepayers/ which may be read by unregistered people.

 

 

 

“Last week’s announcement by Birmingham City Council that it was commissioning a feasibility study into whether to bid to host the 2026 Commonwealth Games was as surprising as it was welcome”.

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So writes Steve Beauchampé, co-author of ‘Played in Birmingham’, Former International Officer of the FSA and member of Birmingham’s Euro ’96 Organising Committee.

Beauchampé notes that in general there had been little expectation of any alteration to the local authority’s previously stated position that a bid was not viable, in a period of unprecedented cuts to council services and substantially diminished central government grants. He continued:

“So what has changed?

“Several things perhaps: Chancellor George Osborne’s departure from office, which has seen his Northern Powerhouse project downgraded, or at least reconfigured as a more balanced national approach to devolution; that new Prime Minister Theresa May’s chief advisor Nick Timothy is from Birmingham, which might result in the city receiving a fairer hearing in Whitehall than was previously the case”.

The backing of the recently established West Midlands Combined Authority, as well as that of the Greater Birmingham and Solihull Local Enterprise Partnership may well have been decisive, according to Beauchampé, who points out that, “both of these organisations are potentially able to access the sizeable funding streams necessary to develop the infrastructure improvements required to put on a high profile global event and deliver substantial economic regeneration as a consequence”. 

To secure the tacit support of central government and then the nomination of Commonwealth Games England, Birmingham must forget the notion of an ‘austerity’ Games:

“The Games, and the physical legacy they leave, must be tangible, its focal point both visible and accessible from the city centre. And whilst most of the facilities required already exist, albeit with some needing to be adapted, expanded or upgraded, several new venues and facilities will both be required and desirable (including a competition standard 50m pool, a velodrome and an athletes’ village)”.

He emphasizes that the region’s history and culture – sporting, artistic, ethnic and otherwise – should be mined and celebrated both in advance of, and during, the ten day spectacular of competition; there needs to be imagination in each aspect of how the event is conceived and delivered, and in how its benefits are to be maximised and secured afterwards. A Greater Birmingham bid needs to show how the region would advance the concept of what the Commonwealth Games can be, as successfully as London 2012 did with the Olympics.

Beauchampé reminds us that Manchester did not see staging the Commonwealth Games as the end of a process, but merely the beginning: “It’s an approach and a mindset that we too should adopt”.

Read the whole article: Bring The Games To Birmingham here: http://thebirminghampress.com/2016/10/bring-the-games-to-birmingham-2/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.playedinbritain.co.uk/authors.php

SAVE OUR BATHS!