Archives for category: Heritage buildings

Tudor Grange House, described in The Victorian as ‘a significant Jacobean style house’, was built in 1887 for Alfred Lovekin, a Birmingham silversmith (background here). It was ‘impressive at the outset and made more so by the 1901 alterations for Sir Alfred Bird’, son of the creator of Bird’s baking and custard powder. Its wood panelling, ornamental ceilings, antique glass and tapestry works led to its listing in 2008 (further detail here).

The house was put on the market by Solihull College in 2016 because it was not being ‘fully utilised by the College and has become too costly to maintain’.

Felix Nobes in the Solihull Observer reported on plans for change of use and alterations submitted by the developer, Octopus Healthcare, to convert Tudor Grange House into a home for the elderly, with 64-bed care home and 44 assisted living units. These were unanimously approved by Solihull borough council’s planning committee, according to the Coventry Telegraph (30th April).

The planning report states that many of the works proposed would preserve and even enhance the ‘designated heritage asset’. It concluded that certain aspects of the scheme – perhaps a reference to the building of additional standalone units and the loss of two ‘veteran trees’ – would cause ‘less than substantial harm’. Elliot Brown took a series of photographs showing trees on the site, including this one:

The comprehensive report by Solihull’s Head of Development Management comments: “In this instance, whilst the loss of the two veteran trees is considered significant, it is considered that this harm would be clearly outweighed by the numerous benefits as set out in this report”.

A separate planning application will go through council with regard to the building’s heritage and listed building consent.

 

 

 

 

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CoStar reports that through Rothschild & Co (condor.enquiries@rothschild.com), Network Rail has begun to sell its commercial estate and most of this property is located in railway arches.

They will be sold as leasehold with Network Rail retaining the freehold to ensure maintenance access rights continue. Project Condor is expected to raise more than £1bn and Mark Carne, Network Rail’s chief executive said: “This deal will bring more investment into the commercial estate for the benefit of the local communities and it will help fund a better railway. I hope to see areas around the railway positively transformed with new and refurbished shops, amenities, and extra facilities for local people and passengers.”

A mailing from the New Economics Foundation recalls that in 2015 Network Rail struck a bargain with chancellor George Osborne: “give us the funds we need for infrastructure upgrades, and we’ll sell off a big chunk of our assets. The railway arches are one of those assets”.

Around 80% of the property is located in London, with much of the rest in Manchester and Birmingham. Occupiers of railway arches include restaurants, bars, offices, retail, leisure operators, breweries, car washes, gyms and healthcare centres.

We were unable to contact Tom Maher, co-founder of Birmingham’s Original Patty Men, who serves locally sourced longhorn beef burgers – and more – to appreciative customers in one of Digbeth’s railway bridge arches (above) in Shaw’s Passage.  Last year the Mail described its expansion plans to expand into the premises on the right, retaining the outdoor seating area in the space between the bar and restaurant with a bakery at the back.

Will the OPM be adversely affected? We hope not.

Network Rail’s sale is expected to attract attention from private equity and sovereign wealth funds who would find the average rents – at around £8 to £9 per sq ft – rather low, but CoStar reports that Network Rail has met stern resistance from small business owners, notably in Hackney, E1, and Brixton, SW9.


Supported by the New Economics Foundation and the East End Trades Guild, a group of arches tenants from around the country (three above and many more pictures here) has formed Guardians of the Arches to oppose the sale and seek a viable settlement for the future.

They are organising an open letter to Chris Grayling asking him to halt the sale and meet them to talk about the future of the arches. Thousands have signed this letter in just the first few days, and the group are planning a lobby of parliamentarians in June. Readers may sign as suggested below.

The NEF article ends: “Like many public asset sales, it makes little sense no matter how you look at it. In financial terms, selling off the asset means Network Rail – and by extension the public – will no longer benefit from the steady annual rental yields generated by the portfolio. And it’s no excuse to say there’s no other way of funding infrastructure improvements. The Government is currently able to borrow at historically low interest rates, but instead they are forcing public bodies to sell income-generating assets to fund investment”. 

 Click here to sign the Guardians’ letter to the Secretary of State for Transport.

 

 

 

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Birmingham Friends of the Earth’s building, The Warehouse, enters the final stage of its refurbishment project.

The building is really starting to look like the plans developed for the Share offer. Jericho has continued to reshape the building internally. New windows and doors have been installed on the ground floor which let in a lot more light than the old shutters.

Middle Bay has been cleared and is now the seating area for the Warehouse Cafe. A new kitchen has been installed for the Warehouse Café which is up and running again.

A lift has been installed and was officially opened. It will allow volunteers not previously able to access the top floor of the building, to do so. The ribbon cutting ceremony:

The new Meeting Room spaces will soon be finished and will be open for bookings. Existing tenants – businesses and community groups – will thrive in the improved building which will also offer opportunities to new businesses and community groups.

Shaz Rahman writes:

“The building looks dramatically different. I was amazed when I saw the new shop front for The Warehouse for the first time. What was once a dreary entrance, which had no appealing features, is now an inviting shop front. The glass makes the space look really large. We are really proud of what has been achieved at Birmingham Friends of the Earth. An incredible amount of time and effort went into the Community Share Offer, and even more time and effort has gone into implementing the building project. Internally the building is unrecognisable from what it was a year ago and so we thank our investors for helping to make this idea become a reality”.

 

 

 

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‘We Are Balsall Heath’ Street Festival on Sunday brought together the diverse communities of Balsall Heath.

The Moseley Road was closed until 7pm and people enjoyed artists performances, a food hub representing dishes from all communities, street stalls, open doors to community buildings, heritage trails, games and much more.

Photograph: John Newson

The organisers had stalls along the route – above: the Friends of Moseley Road Baths stall in front of Moseley Road Baths. 

 

 

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MELA social enterprise’s new ‘We Are’ neighbourhood campaign will start with ‘We Are Balsall Heath’ Street Festival on Sunday April 22 bringing together the diverse communities of Balsall Heath.

On Sunday 22nd April, Moseley Road will be closed between 8am and 7pm for the “We Are Balsall Heath” Mela. There will be 8 artist performances and installations, a food hub representing dishes from all communities, street stalls, open doors to community buildings, heritage trails, games and much more for a family fun day out. Please join us! https://www.facebook.com/weareBHMELA/

The organisers will have stalls all along the route and the Friends of MRB will be in front of Moseley Road Baths. From the stall Friends of MRB will be arranging some short tours of the building, bearing in mind that Pool 2 will in use until 1:30pm. The Gala Pool will still be out of bounds, unfortunately, but we can show you other unseen areas of the Grade II* listed building. Don’t forget that Moseley Road Baths has now reopened for swimming and is being run by a charity set up by volunteers from the local community.

On Sunday 22nd April there will be two Be Active sessions in the morning, both for public swimming – 10:00-11:00am and then 11:15-12:15 – so remember to bring your swimming costume to the Mela!

 

 

 

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Vintage Trains runs Tyseley Locomotive Works (below) in Birmingham, restores and cares for its collection of historic steam engines and carriages, preserving traditional skills and ensuring steam locomotives from a bygone era remain in service for people to enjoy. The company has promoted express steam train excursions to destinations including York, Oxford and the Cotswolds for a number of years.

It launched the share offer in January intending to set up a train operating co-operative, in a move expected to create up to 11 full-time roles. The firm is now within touching distance of its first target of £800,000 which will allow it to establish itself as a train operating company and be in control of its own destiny. More than £600,000 has been raised by its share sale to date. Other funds to be raised will be used to invest in teaching traditional railway skills and to preserve the historic fleet of steam locomotives.

Curzon Street Station

Community share members will have voting rights, travel benefits on the company’s services and, after six years, members may also have the opportunity to receive interest payments on their shares and to withdraw their capital.

Adrian Shooter, the former chairman of Chiltern Railways who will chair the Vintage Trains operating company, said: “There is still time to get involved in this unique opportunity and own a piece of history whilst helping us to train young engineers, and continue the investment in our fleet of locomotives and carriages.”

Through the share offer and investment, Vintage Trains said it was hoping to boost Birmingham’s tourist economy through an increased programme of trips and additional services and will work to deliver a heritage gateway to the city, incorporating the grade I listed 1832 Curzon Street station and the 1906 Moor Street station terminus (above).

For the share offer see: http://www.vintagetrains.co.uk/offerinfo.aspx

 

 

 

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Moseley Road Baths CIO (Charitable Incorporated Organisation) will be re-opening the pool on Saturday 7th April 2018 from 8:45am with public swimming sessions starting at 9am and running until 2pm. Visit the CIO website:  http://moseleyroadbaths.org.uk/

Birmingham City Council staff will be continuing to support the CIO during a transitionary period so there will still be many familiar faces at the baths for a while yet.

There is a new timetable which prioritises school and club swimming and the current cost per swim will remain the same but there will not be a concessionary rate as MRB can no longer be part of Birmingham City Council’s Passport to Leisure scheme.  The CIO are hoping to find funding to support a reduced rate but this may take a little time. View the new timetable.

There are various volunteering opportunities to train and gain experience as a receptionist, lifeguard, social media volunteer or help with basic maintenance workFollow the link to find out more! http://moseleyroadbaths.org.uk/volunteering

The Trustees of Moseley Road Baths CIO are all volunteers who are proud of this historic pool which has been serving the people of Balsall Heath and beyond for over 110 years.

The next meeting of the Friends of Moseley Road Baths will be on Thursday 12th April, 7pm, Moseley Road Baths Tea Room. All are welcome!

 

 

 

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Some time ago West Midlands metro mayor Andy Street travelled to Finland – thought to be the only country in Europe where homelessness is falling.

He said: “We have got to be realistic about this. This can’t be about a sticking plaster. We have got to ask ourselves the question, are we prepared to make a similar commitment?”

Emmaus has the answer to rehabilitation of the long-term homeless, offering both accommodation and work of a socially useful nature.

As its website says, “overcoming homelessness means more than a roof over your head”. Without a purpose formerly homeless people placed in ‘permanent accommodation’ become lonely and still feel like ‘outsiders’ and eventually have to leave because of alcohol, drug or debt problems.

Mayor:  travel to Cambridge Emmaus to see the homeless rehabilitated

The mayor of Birmingham may visit the Coventry Emmaus, probably the nearest, or better still, go the centre in Cambridge, the ideal aimed for by Emmaus, where housing and workshops are on the same site – and also a place where locals can come and buy restored goods at modest prices from restored people.

The secular Emmaus movement flourishes on the continent where it was started in 1945 by a French priest to help homeless ex-servicemen to repair war-damaged houses.

Men and women come off income support, collect, refurbish and repair goods and offer them for sale. In exercising a skill and offering goods at quite a low price they meet a need and know that once more they have a useful role to play.

Those who had an alcohol addiction, go out for a drink but are expected to behave acceptably. Even if they are asked to leave because of bad behaviour they know that they can always return after a while.

The four storey Trinity Centre (a former church, a listed building) in Camp Hill near the city centre, highlighted on this site in 2014, would offer a suitable site, as Emmaus prefers to have the residential, working and retail activities on the same site.. It housed many homeless ex-servicemen and workers displaced by machinery.

The ground floor was a dormitory, with three aisles, like the one below and the centre led up to the chantry altar in which a Sunday service was held each week. All meals were cooked in a splendidly fitted kitchen, there was a recreation room, a visiting library (taken round by the writer) and a rehabilitation flat on the top storey.

When the Centre was put up for sale some local people suggested that this converted four storey Anglican ‘Commissioners’ church and the land nearby would be perfect for an Emmaus Community.

 

Could Trinity Centre become the city’s first Emmaus?

Bishop David Urquhart is a Church Commissioner: should the Mayor contact him?

 

 

 

enquiries@emmauscoventry.org.uk

 

– though in Coventry this has not been possible.

Mayor Andy Street and Bishop David Urquhart could begin to address homelessness

Some time ago West Midlands metro mayor Andy Street travelled to Finland – thought to be the only country in Europe where homelessness is falling.

He said: “We have got to be realistic about this. This can’t be about a sticking plaster. We have got to ask ourselves the question, are we prepared to make a similar commitment?”

Emmaus has the answer to rehabilitation of the long-term homeless, offering both accommodation and work of a socially useful nature.

As its website says, “overcoming homelessness means more than a roof over your head”. Without a purpose formerly homeless people placed in ‘permanent accommodation’ become lonely and still feel like ‘outsiders’ and eventually have to leave because of alcohol, drug or debt problems.

Mayor Andy Street:  travel to Cambridge Emmaus to see the homeless rehabilitated

The mayor of Birmingham may visit the Coventry Emmaus, probably the nearest, or better still, go the centre in Cambridge, the ideal aimed for by Emmaus, where housing and workshops are on the same site – and also a place where locals can come and buy restored goods at modest prices from restored people.

The Emmaus movement flourishes on the continent where it was started in 1945 by a French priest to help homeless ex-servicemen to repair war-damaged houses.

Men and women come off income support, collect, refurbish and repair goods and offer them for sale. In exercising a skill and offering goods at quite a low price they meet a need and know that once more they have a useful role to play.

Those who had an alcohol addiction, go out for a drink but are expected to behave acceptably. Even if they are asked to leave because of bad behaviour they know that they can always return after a while.

The four storey Trinity Centre (a former church, a listed building) in Camp Hill near the city centre, highlighted on this site in 2014, would offer a suitable site, as Emmaus prefers to have the residential, working and retail activities on the same site.. It housed many homeless ex-servicemen and workers displaced by machinery.

The ground floor was a dormitory, with three aisles, like the one below and the centre led up to the chantry altar in which a Sunday service was held each week. All meals were cooked in a splendidly fitted kitchen, there was a recreation room, a visiting library (taken round by the writer) and a rehabilitation flat on the top storey.

When the Centre was put up for sale some local people suggested that this converted four storey Anglican ‘Commissioners’ church and the land nearby would be perfect for an Emmaus Community.

 

Could Trinity Centre become the city’s first Emmaus?

Bishop David Urquhart is a Church Commissioner: should the Mayor contact him?

 

 

 

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Gone but not forgotten – but will Birmingham ever learn?

Mary Keating, from campaign group Brutiful Birmingham, asks why Birmingham seems to dislike its Brutalist history so much

 Birmingham’s Central Library before demolition

Read on here: https://ourbirmingham.wordpress.com/john-madins-central-library-january-2018/

 

 

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‘Visitor Information Centre’ is a name that kept the writer away for many months anticipating only leaflets and the usual memorabilia made in China.

What a delight to find that most of the offerings are skilfully handcrafted treasures made by Friends of the Carillon, local artists recording Bournville village scenes and working in wood, glass metal and wool. Some items are ‘bought in’ but selected with great care. There are also books and recordings of the carillon; DVDs for sale include a Christmas selection and the Summer Concert featuring Frank Steijns and the carillon, transmitted live from Maastricht.

To exhibit and sell their work the Friends of the Carillon agree to serve for two hours each week in the centre and donate a percentage of the sale price to the Carillon. A minimum of 20% of all proceeds goes to supporting carillon activities and promotion.

The Carillon Visitor Centre is open Monday to Saturday 10am to 4.30pm (except for the month of January). It makes a vital contribution to the maintenance of the nearby carillon.

Formerly known as the Rest House, the building was designed by the architect who also drew plans for workers’ housing and two Bournville schools, William Alexander Harvey. He aimed to design a building that “would be in entire harmony with its surroundings”, basing it on a seventeenth-century Yarn Market hall at Dunster in Somerset.

George and Elizabeth Cadbury celebrated their silver wedding anniversary in April 1913 and the Rest House was built to commemorate the occasion.

It was commissioned by the employees of Cadbury Brothers Ltd at Bournville and in all parts of the world as “A lasting memorial of esteem and affection as an expression of gratitude for the unceasing interest in their welfare and in admiration of manifold services to the world at large”.

Above, crowds gathered for the opening of the building designed to be used as a place of rest “providing kind shelter and seating”. More photographs and information here.

The Rest House was closed for many years but protected from vandalism and abuse. It was brought back into use by Bournville Village Trust and the vision and sheer hard work of its manager, Joy Workman, who is married to Trevor, the Bournville Carilloneur  (left).

In November 1997 the building was re-opened by Robin Cadbury as the Carillon Visitor Centre and used as a focal point for the carillon – another valued legacy from the founder of Bournville.

The Carillon Visitor Centre is also the place where tours start to Bournville carillon (left). The carillon, a rare and unusual musical instrument, has been in use since the 15th century and looks like an organ. Carillons have a minimum of 23 bells and played from a ‘baton’ keyboard.

The instrument and the carillon art are most commonly found in Belgium, Holland, France but are a rarity in the UK. Read more on the website and see the photos taken by Amanda Slater.

The tours take place on Saturdays at 12 noon and 3pm. Visits are free of charge but donations are invited in support of the “Friends of Bournville Carillon”, a self-financing Charitable Trust. Booking is advised as numbers on each tour are strictly limited: 07986 552770, email bournvillecarillon@hotmail.co.uk, or book at The Visitor Centre.

 

 

 

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