As many teachers, social workers, GPs, disabled and disadvantaged people are driven to desperation by their tortuous ‘reforms’, government now proposes to ‘reform’ the charitable sector.

persimmon solihullRuefully citizens watch and attempt to protest as the Conservative government spends their taxpayers’ money – so often unwisely and against the public interest. They have seen local councils robbed of their housing stock – and political devotion to the corporate sector favouring the landlord interest and delighting other potential party funders – builders of ugly, expensive and ‘poky’ housing (left, in Solihull).

Having failed to induce charities to take over social care at rock bottom prices (Big Society agenda to increase the sector’s role in public service provision) government has reduced their funding and is now attempting to break up the housing trusts set up by philanthropists.

Government proposals will eventually benefit the landlord and corporate building sector by destroying the cherished legacies of philanthropic groups and individuals the Guinness Partnership, the Fry Housing trust, Aster, B3Living, Midland Heart, Orbit, Poplar HARCA, Riverside, Sovereign, SpectrumTrafford Housing Trust, the Haig Housing Trust and the Bournville Village Trust (below).

bournville social housing

In a Post report, Peter Roach, chief executive of Bournville Village Trust, described the plan as “unfair and shameful”. He said: “We understand people’s home ownership aspirations, but the concept of giving huge amounts of taxpayers’ money to provide discounts for people already enjoying the comfort of good quality affordable homes whilst at the same time watching waiting lists soar is unfair and shameful.”

Game set and match?

The government states that every house purchased will be replaced “on a one-for-one basis” with more affordable homes but the Department for Communities and Local Government admits that though 1.88m council homes in England have been sold since right to buy was introduced – 37% of the total stock of council homes – local authorities have built just 345,000 homes over the same period. It fails to add that this has been due to central government restrictions on the use of money derived from local housing sales. If government means to keep its word this time, profit-driven building corporations will demand subsidies – taxpayers’ money to induce them to build the social housing needed and promised by government.

The social gap widens: whilst these proposals will cheer rather than disturb government grandees with second and third homes inherited, acquired or bestowed [latest taxpayer funded stately home in the Cotswolds ironically for unelected minister for social equality], 3.4 million people are now on the national waiting list for social housing in England.

Read further: http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/apr/14/right-to-buy-housing-associations-your-questions-answered

 

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