West Midlands New Economics Group

Thursday 23rd May, 5-7 pm

Open meeting: FOE Warehouse, 54 Allison St, B5 5TH

Anne Britton-Munoz will open the discussion
‘Food is a Weapon’

https://www.corbettreport.com/food-is-a-weapon/

Episode 041 – Food is a Weapon : The Corbett Report

Description: What do the Rockefellers, the Gates, Monsanto, the Norwegian government and other nefarious entities have to do with the doomsday seed vault? And what is their endgame. Let’s connect the dots and find out who the enemy really is …

A round table discussion

All welcome.

Contributions of £2 to cover the cost of room hire

 

 

 

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West Midlands New Economics Group

Andrew Lydon will open a discussion on the Yellow Vest movement in France.

Open meeting, Thursday 25th April 5-7 pm: FOE Warehouse, 54 Allison St, B5 5TH

Andrew has been closely following parts of the Yellow Vest movement, mainly through social media. He also visited one of the Saturday actions in January in the northern French town of Arras.

Part of the march performed a little ritual in front of the Bank of France building in Arras. Andrew Lydon visible on the extreme right of photo.

A round table discussion – all welcome. 

Contributions of £2 to cover the cost of room hire

 

 

 

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A Moseley reader recently reflected that neither of the administrations have governed the city well. Is it simply too unwieldy?

The micro, self-reliant, self-helping project

Early in his career, Nick Cohen worked for the Birmingham Post and Mail. In the New Statesman he wrote: “I would often cover the glaring inadequacies of the city council. The micro, self-reliant and self-helping project seemed, and often was, preferable. Birmingham City Council is the largest municipality in the country. But its strength has been sapped by decades of centralisation and confidence undermined by the espousal of the pseudo-democracy of management consultants.

The award-winning Bureau of Investigative Journalism has carried out a major investigation, assisted by journalists all over the country.

It discovered that councils are selling thousands of public spaces – from libraries and community centres to playgrounds and pools – using some of the proceeds to fund further service cuts and redundancy payments.

Birmingham was the biggest spender – in terms of funding redundancies through selling assets

Though Birmingham City Council only provided partial information about sale prices and incomplete information about those receiving these public assets, we are told that between 2014 and 2018 Birmingham Council sold 334 public spaces.

To see what your council has sold, enter the name of your city into this interactive map.

The MP for Perry Barr, where the council has sold off land and buildings and spent the proceeds on making workers redundant, said, “We should never have been selling the land that we have inherited from our forefathers […] It just takes the future away from our children and grandchildren to come and that is really devastating.”

Dick Atkinson, whose work in Balsall Heath has been well-documented, advocated a return to Birmingham’s original ten villages. Many would agree that the experienced and successful Bournville Village Trust could oversee and guide the setting up of ten such village trusts with appropriate capital and income –– leaving a reduced council staff to co-ordinate city-wide services such as refuse collection and transport.

 

 

 

 

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Jubilee Debt Campaign Birmingham invites you to

 Climate Change and Debt

On Thursday 4th April Ellen Teague is to speak at 7pm in the Warehouse, 54-57 Allison Street, Birmingham, B5 5TH , 0121 632 6909.  

Shared food can be brought from 6.30pm. Drinks are provided at £1.50 per person.

Ellen is the Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation (JPIC) Media Worker at Columbans in Britain,a Catholic organization working in fifteen countries with a special commitment to Asia and Latin America and campaigning for economic and environmental justice.

As many of us know from the experience of our committee member, Ray Collier, who has worked in the Philippines, the Columbans have been at the forefront of the campaign for environmental and social justice, dating back to the early 1970s. They work with people of all faiths and none.

She speaks on the “Columban journey of divestment from fossil fuels”  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PHAC8mp5ikQ

Further information on the JDC Climate Debt Campaign is on

https://jubileedebt.org.uk/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Drop-it-16-winter-2018-WEB.pdf

 

 

 

 

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Localise West Midlands has run peer mentoring schemes in the past and for the past two years we have been part of a national coalition looking at ways of getting peer mentoring and other mutual learning schemes off the ground.  This coalition includes Transition Network, Regen SW, Permaculture Association, and Renew Wales.

Localise West Midlands are currently carrying out a feasibility study, which is funded by the National Lottery Community Fund, which aims to discover how best to share learning, looking at tools, such as peer mentoring, which can be used to support greater growth and success within the community economic development sector.

The study is being carried out in urban, suburban and rural West Midlands (Coventry, Birmingham, Solihull, Dudley, Sandwell, Walsall and Wolverhampton plus Warwickshire, Worcestershire, Herefordshire, Staffordshire & Shropshire).

Peer learning is one of the best ways to help people turn their good ideas from dreams into reality. Learning from someone like yourself who has travelled a similar journey to you, is often more powerful than formal learning.

The aim is to transfer knowledge from experienced or specialist practitioners to those seeking to build a successful community enterprise. The study seeks to find out how practical such tools are and what factors affect their success.


The study takes a broad view of the community economic development sector. Parts of the sector we particularly wish to cover include:

Community Energy Schemes
•Community Food Growing / Cooking Schemes
•Community Organisations providing services to deprived or under-served communities (urban, suburban and rural)
•Community Transport Schemes
•Community Employment Training Schemes

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* The survey closes on the 30th April 2019.*

This survey should take around 20 minutes to complete and to thank you for your time, we are offering participants the chance to win a £50 Marks & Spencers voucher. (Please leave your email at the end of the survey to be entered).

 

To go to the survey click here:  

https://david883665.typeform.com/to/jBWXaI

 

 

 

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Eve Jones invites all to join a peaceful, lawful march this Saturday to ask Birmingham City Council to declare a climate emergency and to introduce sweeping measures to combat global warming and mass extinction:

1. Debate a climate emergency motion at full council;
2. Pledge to make the city of Birmingham carbon neutral by 2025;
3. Call on Westminster to provide the powers and resources to make this target achievable;
4. Work with other local authorities on methods to limit Global Warming to less than 1.5°C;
5. Work with partners across the West Midlands to deliver this goal;
6. Report to Full Council within six months with the actions the Council will take to address this emergency.

Meet outside Waterstones by the bullring and march up New Street to Victoria Square, where the protest will take place. Meet at 12.30pm outside Waterstones or 1pm at Victoria Square.

Though the UK government admits we are failing to meet Paris Agreement targets which would keep us below a 2 degree rise, two weeks ago, when the House of Commons debated climate change for the first time in two years, 610 MPs stayed away. This seems at odds with the level of threat which we face, which is why we want our government to take urgent action now before we are forced to endure the consequences

The biggest price is already being paid by the very poorest of the world’s citizens and by nations least able to protect themselves (see Cyclone Idai in Malawi and Mozambique, for example) and even here in the UK it has been reported that our agricultural harvest was already 20% less productive in 2018 due to unusual weather-patterns. Eve ends:

“When we march on Saturday, we want to show Birmingham City Council and the people of Birmingham that we are united as a city and speak with one voice. We want groups from all of our communities to come down, make themselves visible, and make their voices heard”.

Read more here: www.facebook.com/extinctionrebellionbirmingham

 

 

 

 

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Research has shown that traffic congestion cost the British economy almost £8 billion last year and that air pollution is ‘emerging’ as a public health issue. Dozens of councils will face legal action after failing to tackle toxic gas from diesels.

Yesterday the West Midlands Combined Authority approved a trial which will provide motorists with money – up to £3,000 a year – to be spent on public transport, electric car hire and bike sharing schemes in exchange for giving up their vehicle. The project will be launched in Coventry this year before being expanded across the West Midlands and elsewhere if it proves successful.

Cash credits will be loaded on to a smartphone app or a Swift card, which is similar to London’s Oyster card but can be spent on public transport, car sharing or green hire schemes.

Andy Street, the Conservative mayor of the West Midlands, said: “We want to make it quick, easy and cheap for everyone to travel around the region by creating a range of reliable alternatives to private car ownership . . . This is a bold, ambitious vision for the future, and we’re confident we can prove the concept in the West Midlands and

The project will be funded as part of a £20 million government “future mobility” grant but taxpayer support will eventually be replaced by long-term funding from private companies including electric car clubs and bus or train operators.

One reader commented that any serious attempt to reduce car usage (congestion and pollution) would involve improving public transport – a far more costly undertaking.

Another, who lived in Stuttgart for two years writes, “Car ownership is much higher in Germany, but their owners are willing to leave them at home and use public transport where it’s a better choice. Unfortunately, in the UK our public transport outside London is not integrated, generally not frequent and not cheap – and this would take decades of investment to put right.

 

 

 

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 West Midlands New Economics Group

Thursday 28th March 5-7 pm

Open meeting: FOE Warehouse, 54 Allison St, B5 5TH

Margaret Okole will open the discussion. She writes:

Recent years have seen several cases of mass action in response to issues which people feel strongly about. Examples in this country are the poll tax riots, Stop the War, and the Occupy movement. The relatively small scale poll tax riots are credited with bringing down Margaret Thatcher; the Stop the War march, despite involving a much larger number of people, failed to stop Tony Blair declaring war; the Occupy movement, which began in the US in 2011 and spread to many other countries including the UK, gained a lot of attention in the UK from 2011 to about 2014 but does not appear to have made any dent in the “capitalist” system (for want of a better word) which it blames for rising and intolerable inequality.

Extinction Rebellion seems to have a lot in common with the Occupy movement in its international focus and its organisation or lack of it. The interesting question is whether it can achieve any more than Occupy has done.

I will aim to first compare these different actions and consider why they did or did not succeed.

Secondly I will look at how Extinction Rebellion is organised (clearly it has drawn from the Occupy template) and what methods it uses. Here I will give a subjective account of being involved as a member. Finally I will speculate on whether Extinction Rebellion can achieve its aims.

To find out what Extinction Rebellion’s aims are, go to https://rebellion.earth

A round table discussion

All welcome. 

Contributions of £2 to cover the cost of room hire

 

 

 

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A Yardley Wood resident asks, “Will Birmingham play its part in the national effort?”

20,000 signatures from Birmingham residents will lead to a climate emergency debate in full council. To see, and hopefully sign the petition, click here.

London, Liverpool, Manchester, Bristol and 23 smaller local authorities in the UK have already passed motions declaring a climate emergency.

The effects of climate change are already being felt around the world. In the UK, we have seen increased levels of drought, flooding, storm damage, and this February even wildfire. In order to reduce the chance of runaway Global Warming and limit the effects of Climate Breakdown, we need to reduce our CO2 equivalent emissions by all means possible as quickly as possible.

The IPCC’s Special Report on Global Warming, published last October, describes the enormous harm that a 2°C temperature rise is likely to cause compared to a 1.5°C rise. It states that limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from authorities, but we only have 12 years (to 2030) to achieve this: see https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/

City Councils around the world are responding by declaring a ‘Climate Emergency’ and committing resources to address it.

 

 

 

 

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A Bournville reader has drawn attention to the research findings revealed in a BBC programme.

The BBC’s Shared Data Unit, used freedom of information requests and Land Registry data to obtain information on 92,000 Right to Buy sales across England, Scotland and Wales recording an average of £69,000 each from the scheme since 2000, according to the Times. The biggest profits were in London, with buyers in Islington making almost £100,000 each on average.

From the data gathered, it was calculated that 140 tenants bought and resold their council homes within a month, generating a collective profit of £3 million or £21,000 each.

In one case, a former council tenant in Solihull purchased his/her council home for £8,000 and sold it for £285,000 nine days later. Did s/he and others pay back some or all of the discount they received – as those who sell within five years of purchasing are required to?

State of play until 2013: source, Ampp3d, a data-journalism website for Trinity Mirror 

In January 2017, Right to Buy was halted in Wales, as it was in Scotland in 2016 after 37 years.

The devolved administrations argued that its cost to the social housing supply has been too great. Despite central government pledges to replace homes sold through Right to Buy, most receipts have been returned to the Treasury rather than reinvested in affordable housing.

The Financial Times noted that some 40% of right-to-buy homes pass into the private rented sector, where they may continue to absorb government funds through housing benefit.

The Chartered Institute of Housing once again repeated its call for Right to Buy to be suspended in England.

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Our reader commented that George Cadbury encountered similar profiteering in the early days of Bournville and set up the Bournville Village Trust to administer the project. See Bournville, Model Village to Garden Suburb, Harrison pp 44 Publisher Phillimore, ISBN 1 86077 117 3.

Extract from Management and Organisational Behaviour by Laurie J. Mullins 

 

 

 

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